Tag Archives: Funimation

‘Shin Godzilla’ Gets a US Trailer

Back in July we found out Toho’s latest Godzilla film, Shin Godzilla, would get a limited run in American theaters thanks to Funimation. Well, we now have a trailer for that release… and it sure is a trailer.

Don’t expect to see anything new, or to hear any dialogue (as the release will have subtitles that probably aren’t perfected yet), but here it is… all trailer like.

Shin Godzilla will appear in American theaters from October 11-18.

You Can See Godzilla Resurgence in an American Theater

This past weekend at Comic Con was filled with more than just new trailers, we also finally got information on an American release for Hideaki Anno and Shinji Higuchi’s Shin Gojira (Godzilla Resurgence) After a long wait, we finally can confirm (as of last Friday) that Funimation has picked up the rights for the US distribution of the film and are going to be bringing it to American theaters.

Its probably safe to assume that, much like the recent Dragonball Z and the live action Attack on Titan Films, this film will have a limited US theatrical release, but frankly, I couldn’t be more excited. Most of the Millenium Godzilla movies were not given a US theatrical release, so the chance to see Japanese Godzilla on the big screen once more is incredibly exciting!

Godzilla Resurgence opens in Japan, this week.

via: io9

Funimation Makes Official Statement Regarding Fan Art and Derivative Works

Fanart is a mainstay of most artist alleys. Sure, it skirts the line of fair use – and there are multiple opinions on the matter – but for the most part anime companies let it slide (even though they maintain that it’s covered by copyright). It’s a complicated issue to say the least, and most cons find themselves guessing how to balance making artists, attendees and the big anime companies happy all at once.

Well, Funimation, currently the largest anime distributor in North America, has put out an official statement clarifying their stance on the matter (via Anime News Network):

At law, a fan-created artwork that is clearly based on existing artwork owned by a copyright holder other than the fan (e.g. Funimation), is considered an unauthorized “derivative work” or an unauthorized reproduction (by substantial similarity) and therefore infringes the copyright holder’s rights under 17 U.S.C. § 106.

Despite Funimation’s legal stance on this issue, Funimation appreciates the entertainment, education and skill that goes into and arises from the imitation and creation of works derived from existing works of popular manga and anime. Funimation likewise realizes that the “Artist Alley” area of most conventions can be a good showcase for these works and therefore Funimation tends not to enforce its copyright rights against those in Artist Alley who may be infringing Funimation’s copyright rights.

Funimation’s trademark rights, on the other hand, cannot go unenforced. This stems from a key distinction between U.S. Copyright Law and U.S. Trademark Law—in short, if copyright rights are not enforced, the copyright stays intact and the copyright holder generally will not suffer any harm beyond the infringement itself. But if trademark rights are not enforced, the trademark can be cancelled. Because of this difference, Funimation cannot knowingly tolerate unauthorized use of its trademarks, such as use of trademarks in conjunction with the display or sale of works whose creation is likewise unauthorized. This means that Funimation will take action if it or its agents discover unauthorized works, including fan art, which include a Funimation-owned/licensed trademark within the work or are on display in conjunction with signage bearing a Funimation-owned/licensed trademark. Note that the trademarks Funimation is primarily concerned with are brand names and logos.

As to the Dealer’s Room, Funimation strictly enforces both its copyright rights and trademark rights, almost without exception. This applies to works that are believed to be counterfeit, unlicensed or fan-created.

So the long and the short of it is that while Funimation considers fanart to be a violation of copyright law (which is a whole other argument), they don’t mind letting it slide in the artist alley as long as no Trademarks are violated – like using official logos.

Which is, y’know, totally reasonable.

Via ANN

Episode 33 – Simuldubtastic!

On this episode of the podcast, we talk about Syfy returning to Sci Fi, the massive announcements in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, how GamerGate is ruining EVERYTHING, the Guardians of the Galaxy soundtrack coming out on cassette tape, and how Funimation is now releasing simultaneous dub releases.

We’re scared about that last one.

We remember the 90s.